April 20, 2014
mothernaturenetwork:

Astronauts to grow lettuce in space with NASA ‘Veggie’ farmThe mini-farm isn’t just for tasty food — the Veg-01 experiment will test how well lettuce and other large plants grow in orbit.

mothernaturenetwork:

Astronauts to grow lettuce in space with NASA ‘Veggie’ farm
The mini-farm isn’t just for tasty food — the Veg-01 experiment will test how well lettuce and other large plants grow in orbit.

(via soleilsouthwest)

April 20, 2014
I LOVE GOATS!

you-are-the-universe:

P.s. I’m gonna paint for a little then respond to questions

They have feelings, they laugh and cry and they are not hear for you to slaughter.

April 20, 2014

(via you-are-the-universe)

April 20, 2014

parkingintopeter:

do you want to hear a joke

the north american education system

(via equality-for-mermaids)

April 20, 2014
misandry-mermaid:

Anon submission:

I am very anti-rape and anti-rape culture and at the age of 11 I was featured in ms. Magazine for being an advocate. I was raised by lesbian mothers. And yet people still treat me like an idiot and say I just don’t understand when I talk about feminism and serious issues because I am “only a kid”. I am 13 years old and taking college courses. I have done my fucking research on these issues and know more about it then any jerky little rape apologist middle school straight white boy (shudder). So I just don’t understand why these people can applaud my mind on school subjects and call me a “genius” but the minute I change the topic to a more serious issue I’m “only a kid” and I “don’t know what I’m talking about” I love this blog btw

misandry-mermaid:

Anon submission:

I am very anti-rape and anti-rape culture and at the age of 11 I was featured in ms. Magazine for being an advocate. I was raised by lesbian mothers. And yet people still treat me like an idiot and say I just don’t understand when I talk about feminism and serious issues because I am “only a kid”. I am 13 years old and taking college courses. I have done my fucking research on these issues and know more about it then any jerky little rape apologist middle school straight white boy (shudder). So I just don’t understand why these people can applaud my mind on school subjects and call me a “genius” but the minute I change the topic to a more serious issue I’m “only a kid” and I “don’t know what I’m talking about”
I love this blog btw

April 20, 2014
"Be nice to people. Smash the patriarchy."

— my dad’s parting wisdom to my sister and I tonight (via peacehon)

(via weirdenlightenment)

April 19, 2014
molecularlifesciences:

theolduvaigorge:

The Exploitative Economics Of Academic Publishing
by Samuel Gershman (MIT)
“Taxpayers in the United States spend $139 billion a year on scientific research, yet much of this research is inaccessible not only to the public, but also to other scientists.(a) This is the consequence of an exploitative scientific journal system that rewards academic publishers while punishing taxpayers, scientists, and universities. Fortunately, cheap open-access alternatives are not only possible, but already beginning to take root, suggesting a way forward to a more open and equitable system for sharing research.
Like many scientists, I provide access to my research papers on my website. I view this as a commonsense way to disseminate knowledge, but not everyone shares this view. A few months ago, I received an email from an official at Princeton University, where I attended graduate school, informing me that a lawyer representing the publishing giant Elsevier had demanded the removal of these papers from my website.(b) When I published these papers in Elsevier journals, I was required to hand over the copyrights. Therefore, I had no choice but to remove the papers.
The vast majority of academic papers are published by corporations like Elsevier, and these corporations are thriving: In 2011, Elsevier made $1.1 billion in profit, at a profit margin of 36% (by comparison, Apple’s 2012 profit margin was 35%). This impressive profitability is due in large part to the fact that the content sold by Elsevier is produced, reviewed, and edited on a volunteer basis by academics like me. We consent to this system because our careers depend on publishing in prestigious journals, almost all of which are owned by Elsevier and a small number of other publishers.
What value is added by academic publishers? In my opinion: very little. Elsevier claims that they add value as they “coordinate the review, consideration, addition of text and references, and other production and distribution mechanisms.” In fact, all of these contributions are or could be obtained at almost no cost.(c) First, reviews are typically coordinated by a combination of volunteer editors (academics) and an automated email system. The cost of setting up and maintaining such an automated system is negligible (a point I will return to later). Elsevier does not add text and references to research papers – academics do. In my experience, corroborated by anecdotes from other scientists, publisher-employed copy editors are mostly superfluous and in some cases even introduce errors into papers or cause substantial publication delays” (read more).
(Source: Footnote 1 via @edgaraltamirano on Twitter; image: Cacophony)

An interesting stance. In my experience, most journal editors are open to placing copies of a pre-published, accepted manuscript on personal websites or public databases, provided one get written permission from the editor. Everything is negotiable.

molecularlifesciences:

theolduvaigorge:

The Exploitative Economics Of Academic Publishing

  • by Samuel Gershman (MIT)

Taxpayers in the United States spend $139 billion a year on scientific research, yet much of this research is inaccessible not only to the public, but also to other scientists.(a) This is the consequence of an exploitative scientific journal system that rewards academic publishers while punishing taxpayers, scientists, and universities. Fortunately, cheap open-access alternatives are not only possible, but already beginning to take root, suggesting a way forward to a more open and equitable system for sharing research.

Like many scientists, I provide access to my research papers on my website. I view this as a commonsense way to disseminate knowledge, but not everyone shares this view. A few months ago, I received an email from an official at Princeton University, where I attended graduate school, informing me that a lawyer representing the publishing giant Elsevier had demanded the removal of these papers from my website.(b) When I published these papers in Elsevier journals, I was required to hand over the copyrights. Therefore, I had no choice but to remove the papers.

The vast majority of academic papers are published by corporations like Elsevier, and these corporations are thriving: In 2011, Elsevier made $1.1 billion in profit, at a profit margin of 36% (by comparison, Apple’s 2012 profit margin was 35%). This impressive profitability is due in large part to the fact that the content sold by Elsevier is produced, reviewed, and edited on a volunteer basis by academics like me. We consent to this system because our careers depend on publishing in prestigious journals, almost all of which are owned by Elsevier and a small number of other publishers.

What value is added by academic publishers? In my opinion: very little. Elsevier claims that they add value as they “coordinate the review, consideration, addition of text and references, and other production and distribution mechanisms.” In fact, all of these contributions are or could be obtained at almost no cost.(c) First, reviews are typically coordinated by a combination of volunteer editors (academics) and an automated email system. The cost of setting up and maintaining such an automated system is negligible (a point I will return to later). Elsevier does not add text and references to research papers – academics do. In my experience, corroborated by anecdotes from other scientists, publisher-employed copy editors are mostly superfluous and in some cases even introduce errors into papers or cause substantial publication delays” (read more).

(Source: Footnote 1 via @edgaraltamirano on Twitter; image: Cacophony)

An interesting stance. In my experience, most journal editors are open to placing copies of a pre-published, accepted manuscript on personal websites or public databases, provided one get written permission from the editor. Everything is negotiable.

(via hyggehaven)

April 19, 2014
calms:

● vintage & indie blog ●

calms:

● vintage & indie blog 

(via foreverpissedoff)

April 19, 2014

Anonymous asked: So I'm a 20 year old girl and I have a bunch of tattoos, including a chest piece and sleeves. Everywhere I go I get stared at, mostly dirty looks. I know they are just staring at my chest piece because it is very big and colorful. But sometimes I feel sad because I feel like they are judging me. And that makes me feel ugly. If someone gives me a dirty look I usually say something to them. But it just hurts. How would you deal with this? <3

towritebeyonceonherarms:

It’s hard to own and wear something that can be considered threatening to people, whether it being booming vibrant dramatic clothing, a tattoo, or even your own face, features and body. People are “threatened” by things in life because, well, quite frankly they just don’t understand it, and better yet they don’t want to understand it. It’s such a shame and I pity those type of people, what kind of life is that to live? When I go out in public people look at me and observe me because of the way I express myself and work with the way I look physically, and sometimes it makes me uncomfortable even if it’s positive attention. But here’s the thing, there’s always going to be someone who is threatened by the way you look and will pinch you with their dirty glances because it’s different, it’s new and something their eyes just haven’t seen before. It totally sucks that that’s a fact of life but you must must must remember that there are so many people that aren’t like that and appreciate self expression and “weirdness” physically, I know I sure as hell do! I love looking at really different looking people when I walk through the city, different textures and bodies and patterns, it’s fascinating and I always come up with little stories behind every person I see (yeah I’m weird.) You gotta own dat chest piece gurl, it’s a big beautiful part of what makes you YOU, be proud of that, wear your skin with pride because it’s what’s protecting your soul, as geeky as that sounds.  I was even talking to my friend the other day about a birthmark on her face that she has always been self conscious about— there’s so much beauty in strangeness, it’s humanizing and refreshing and god that is a gorgeous thing about people. Okay this answer is very all over the place but I hope I helped a little.

Yes!

April 18, 2014

zemmer:

WHEN PEOPLE SAY YOU HAVE PRIVILEGE THEY ARE NOT SAYING THAT YOU DON’T HAVE ANY PROBLEMS

THEY ARE SAYING YOU DO NOT HAVE THE SPECIFIC PROBLEMS THAT COME FROM OPPRESSION

THIS IS NOT A DIFFICULT CONCEPT

And somehow, many do not get this concept.  I need to be reminded of this always, not because I forget, but to remind me that equality does not truly exist yet.

(via rottingpipebomb)

April 18, 2014

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!

Tamara Natalie Madden

Madden lists among influences Gustav Klimt and images of Egyptian royalty. You can view many, many more images of her work here at her official website.

I find these breathtaking acrylic and mixed media paintings evocative of both the Fayum Mummy Portraits and early medieval icons featuring the Black Madonna.

April 18, 2014

i-effed-it-all-up:

when girls think they are better than other girls because they are tomboys who engage in stereotypically “male” activities it makes me want to actually gouge my own eyes out because they are pretty much reinforcing the patriarchal idea that men are better than women without even realizing it and that is just incredibly sad

(via welcome-to-chinatown)

April 17, 2014
Did Facebook's Graffiti Artist Admit To Sexual Assault On His Podcast?

sansaswift:

TW: Rape

David Choe jokingly admits to being a “successful rapist”.

"It’s dangerous and it’s super self destructive. I’m at a place and there’s potential for a lawsuit…and she has given me no signs that she’s into me or that this is appropriate behavior. In my head I go "Do you care if I jerk off right now?" and it sounds so creepy in my head that I go I can’t say that out loud … So I go back to the chill method of you never ask first, you just do it, get in trouble and then pay the price later."

"…So I just start jerking off. So then her hands gets off my leg and she just stops … I go "Look I’m sorry I can’t help myself — can you just pretend like I’m not doing this and you continue with the massage?" And she’s like "All right" and she does  … I’m like "Can I touch your butt?" and I reach out and touch her butt and she pulls away. She doesn’t want me to touch her butt."

[…]

"… I say "Kiss it a little," she says "No, all the massage oil is on it" and I take the back of her head and I push it down on my d**k and she doesn’t do it. And I say "Open your mouth, open your mouth," and she does it and I start facef**king her."

Rape culture is literally admitting to raping somebody and publicizing it online because you’re that sure nothing will happen to you — and nothing does. 

(via misandry-mermaid)

April 17, 2014

policymic:

Interactive map reveals where music genres are most popular

Movoto, a real estate blog, posted the map of the nation’s “musical taste scores,” grabbing data from the National Endowment for the Arts on state-level music preferences, along with numbers from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis by way of the Martin Institute. 

Read more | Follow policymic

April 17, 2014

earthherbs:

That moment you realize you will always love them so much more than they will ever love you, but you don’t care, because you love them..

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